SEWING NEEDLE FOUND IN HALLOWEEN CHOCOLATE BAR in Cornwall Ontario – Nov 12, 2014 #CCPS

 

hallowThe Cornwall Community Police Service would like to remind the public that all Halloween candy should be checked by an adult prior to being consumed.

On November 12th, 2014 the Cornwall Community Police Service was notified that a needle was found inside a child’s Halloween chocolate bar.

No one was injured as a result of the incident that is still under investigation.

13 Responses to "SEWING NEEDLE FOUND IN HALLOWEEN CHOCOLATE BAR in Cornwall Ontario – Nov 12, 2014 #CCPS"

  1. Hugger1   November 12, 2014 at 5:43 PM

    I hope we’re not heading back to when this was commonplace.

  2. jules   November 12, 2014 at 7:17 PM

    Hugger have you heard lately about sewing needles found in potatoes both bagged and loose. My husband heard about that and they said to be very careful about potatoes while handling them and eating. There are many very sick people out there. That happened in my day with the Halloween candy even putting razor blades, moth balls, etc. The society is very sick and I have said that so many times before.

  3. Jason   November 12, 2014 at 7:17 PM

    Actually…this was never common place, before we spread hearsay of “common place” stuff.. let’s get the facts. You might want to start with this great read..The Culture of Fear by Barry Glassner

  4. jules   November 12, 2014 at 9:07 PM

    Jason I know about the culture of fear that we have today but I can tell you that not everything is a culture of just fear but it is real as well. Things have gone on in my day just like today. There are many very sick people out there who are willing to do harm to others.

  5. Hugger1   November 12, 2014 at 10:13 PM

    Yes, Jules, I read about it. They’ve narrowed it down to one particular potato operation. But I can ‘t recall where it is.

  6. Hugger1   November 12, 2014 at 10:17 PM

    Jason….actually back in the 70’s putting razor blades, etc. in Halloween apples, etc. was found quite often. It started a movement amongst parents not to accept any unprepackaged treats (apples, home made candy corn, etc). Only prepackaged candies, treats, etc. were accepted. I just hope it isn’t making a comeback.

  7. Rocket Roy   November 13, 2014 at 9:22 AM

    It was never common. It’s always been isolated. Weirdo passive aggressive types starved for attention. I imagine this sort of thing brings out more bubble wrap. Why not just accept all candy and inspect it at home?

  8. Hugger1   November 13, 2014 at 10:47 AM

    I don’t know where you grew up. But where I grew up this WAS common. We were always hearing about razor blades, needles, etc. In apples, etc.

  9. Thebeezneez   November 13, 2014 at 1:12 PM

    Actual Halloween candy tampering by strangers is a myth. See a cut’n paste below of the evidence. There are a few good books that cover the evidence.

    In 1970, Kevin Toston, a 5-year-old boy from the Detroit area, found and ate heroin his uncle had stashed. The boy died following a four-day coma. The family attempted to protect the uncle by claiming the drug had been sprinkled in the child’s Halloween candy.[8]
    In a 1974 case, Timothy O’Bryan, an 8-year-old boy from Deer Park, Texas, died after eating a cyanide-laced package of Pixy Stix. A subsequent police investigation eventually determined that the poisoned candy had been planted in his trick-or-treat pile by the boy’s father, Ronald Clark O’Bryan, who also gave out poisoned candy to other children in an attempt to cover up the murder. The murderer, who had wanted to claim life insurance money, was executed in 1984.[3]
    In 1978, Patrick Wiederhold, a two-year-old boy from Flint, Michigan died after eating Halloween candy. However, toxicology tests found no evidence of poison and the death was determined to be due to natural causes.[9]
    In 1990, Ariel Katz, a seven-year-old girl in Santa Monica, California, died while trick-or-treating. Early press reports blamed poisoned candy, despite her parents telling the police that she had previously been diagnosed with a serious medical condition, an enlarged heart, which was the actual cause of death.[9]
    In 2001, a four-year-old girl in Vancouver, British Columbia died after eating some Halloween candy. However, there was no evidence of poisoned candy, and she actually died of a streptococcus infection.[9]

  10. jules   November 13, 2014 at 1:31 PM

    In my day (I am 63 years old going on 64) and this happened in Cornwall back in the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s and beyond. There are many very sick people out there and they want to do harm to others. What Hugger said is right that only packaged treats were acceptable. Here in Ottawa a lady who is retired (that is going back to the 80’s) told me that the good parents were making Halloween parties in their homes for the neighborhood kids. There are no Halloweeners at the doors in the buildings which is a good thing. Going into buildings is mighty dangerous and bad enough at people’s homes below.

  11. Hugger1   November 13, 2014 at 4:57 PM

    A myth you say Thebeezneez. Tell that to my parents and the other parents in our apartment building.

  12. jerry   November 14, 2014 at 4:59 PM

    Admin: I’m not even a foe of Jaimie. I’ve given him words of support and encouragement through email and twitter before the election.

  13. jules   November 14, 2014 at 5:47 PM

    Jerry Admin who is Jamie is an excellent person and I supported Leslie O’Shaughnessey because he was the only person who can defeat Bare Ass. Jamie is excellent and no amount of words to describe this good man and the good are always knocked down. Jamie is too good for Cornwall and I said that many times before. We went through hell living in Cornwall and never ever again and that is a promise. I would go just about anywhere but Cornwall. When you live in a civilized place you cannot live in Cornwall. My prayers and best wishes are with Jamie and also with Leslie and Leslie’s job will be a mighty tough one.

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